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An individual’s diet is the sum of food and drink that he or she habitually consumes. Dieting is the practice of attempting to achieve or maintain a certain weight through diet. People’s dietary choices are often affected by a variety of factors, including ethical and religious beliefs, clinical need, or a desire to control weight.

Not all diets are considered healthy. Some people follow unhealthy diets through habit, rather than through a conscious choice to eat unhealthily. Terms applied to such eating habits include “junk food diet” and “Western diet”. Many diets are considered by clinicians to pose significant health risks and minimal long-term benefit. This is particularly true of “crash” or “fad” diets – short-term weight-loss plans that involve drastic changes to a person’s normal eating habits.

Only diets covered on Wikipedia are listed.

Vegetarian diets

A vegetarian diet is one which excludes meat. Vegetarians also avoid food containing by-products of animal slaughter, such as animal-derived rennet and gelatin.

  • Fruitarian diet: A diet which predominantly consists of raw fruit.
  • Lacto vegetarianism: A vegetarian diet that includes certain types of dairy, but excludes eggs and foods which contain animal rennet. A common diet among followers of several religions, including Hinduism, Sikhism and Jainism, based on the principle of Ahimsa (non-harming).
  • Ovo vegetarianism: A vegetarian diet that includes eggs, but excludes dairy.
  • Ovo-lacto vegetarianism: A vegetarian diet that includes eggs and dairy.
  • Vegan diet: In addition to the abstentions of a vegetarian diet, vegans do not use any product produced by animals, such as eggs, dairy products, or honey. The vegan philosophy and lifestyle is broader than just the diet and also includes abstaining from using any products tested on animals and often campaigning for animal rights.

Semi-vegetarian diets

  • Semi-vegetarianism: A predominantly vegetarian diet, in which meat is occasionally consumed.
  • Kangatarian: A diet originating from Australia. In addition to foods permissible in a vegetarian diet, kangaroo meat is also consumed.
  • Pescetarian diet: A diet which includes fish but not other meats.
  • Plant-based diet: A broad term to describe diets in which animal products do not form a large proportion of the diet. Under some definitions a plant-based diet is fully vegetarian; under others it is possible to follow a plant-based diet whilst occasionally consuming meat.
  • Pollotarian: someone who eats chicken or other poultry, but not meat from mammals, often for environmental, health or food justice reasons.
  • Pollo-pescetarian: someone who eats both poultry and fish/seafood, though no meat from mammals.

Weight control diets

A desire to lose weight is a common motivation to change dietary habits, as is a desire to maintain an existing weight. Many weight loss diets are considered by some to entail varying degrees of health risk, and some are not widely considered to be effective. This is especially true of “crash” or “fad” diets.

Many of the diets listed below could fall into more than one subcategory. Where this is the case, it is noted in that diet’s entry.

Low-calorie diets

  • Intermittent fasting: Cycling between non-fasting and fasting as a method of calorie restriction.
  • Body for Life: A calorie-control diet, promoted as part of the 12-week Body for Life program.
  • Cookie diet: A calorie control diet in which low-fat cookies are eaten to quell hunger, often in place of a meal.
  • The Hacker’s Diet: A calorie-control diet from The Hacker’s Diet by John Walker. The book suggests that the key to reaching and maintaining the desired weight is understanding and carefully monitoring calories consumed and used.
  • Nutrisystems Diet: The dietary element of the weight-loss plan from Nutrisystem, Inc. Nutrisystem distributes low-calorie meals, with specific ratios of fats, proteins and carbohydrates.
  • Weight Watchers diet: Foods are assigned point values; dieters can eat any food with a point value provided they stay within their daily point limit.

Very low calorie diets

A very low calorie diet is consuming fewer than 800 calories per day. Such diets are normally followed under the supervision of a doctor. Zero-calorie diets are also included.

  • Inedia (breatharian diet): A diet in which no food is consumed, based on the belief that food is not necessary for human subsistence.
  • KE diet: A diet in which an individual feeds through a feeding tube and does not eat anything.

Low-carbohydrate diets

  • Atkins diet: A low-carbohydrate diet, popularized by nutritionist Robert Atkins in the late-20th and early-21st centuries. Proponents argue that this approach is a more successful way of losing weight than low-calorie diets; critics argue that a low-carb approach poses increased health risks. The Atkins diet consists of four phases (Induction, Balancing, Fine-Tuning and Maintenance) with a gradual increase in consumption of carbohydrates as the person goes through the phases.
  • Dukan Diet: A multi-step diet based on high protein and limited carbohydrate consumption. It starts with two steps intended to facilitate short term weight loss, followed by two steps intended to consolidate these losses and return to a more balanced long-term diet.
  • South Beach Diet: Diet developed by the Miami-based cardiologist Arthur Agatston, M.D., who says that the key to losing weight quickly and getting healthy isn’t cutting all carbohydrates and fats from your diet. It’s learning to choose the right carbs and the right fats.
  • Stillman diet

Low-fat diets

  • McDougall’s starch diet is a high calorie, high fiber, low fat diet that is based on starches such as potatoes, rice, and beans which excludes all animal foods and added vegetable oils. John A. McDougall draws on historical observation of how many civilizations around the world throughout time have thrived on starch foods.

Crash diets

Crash diet and fad diet are general terms. They describe diet plans which involve making extreme, rapid changes to food consumption, but are also used as disparaging terms for common eating habits which are considered unhealthy. Both types of diet are often considered to pose health risks. Many of the diets listed here are weight-loss diets which would also fit into other sections of this list. Where this is the case, it will be noted in that diet’s entry.

  • Beverly Hills Diet: An extreme diet which has only fruits in the first days, gradually increasing the selection of foods up to the sixth week.
  • Cabbage soup diet: A low-calorie diet based on heavy consumption of cabbage soup. Considered a fad diet.
  • Grapefruit diet: A fad diet, intended to facilitate weight loss, in which grapefruit is consumed in large quantities at meal times.
  • Israeli Army diet: An eight-day diet. Only apples are consumed in the first two days, cheese in the following two days, chicken on days five and six, and salad for the final two days. Despite what the name suggests, the diet is not followed by Israel Defense Forces. It is considered a fad diet.
  • Subway diet: A crash diet in which a person consumes Subway sandwiches in place of higher calorie fast foods. Made famous by former obese student Jared Fogle, who lost 245 pounds after replacing his meals with Subway sandwiches as part of an effort to lose weight.
  • Western dietary pattern: A diet consisting of food which is most commonly consumed in developed countries. Examples include meat, white bread, milk and puddings. The name is a reference to the Western world.

Detox diets

Detox diets involve either not consuming or attempting to flush out substances that are considered unhelpful or harmful. Examples include restricting food consumption to foods without colorings or preservatives, taking supplements, or drinking large amounts of water. The latter practice in particular has drawn criticism, as drinking significantly more water than recommended levels can cause hyponatremia.

  • Juice fasting: A form of detox diet, in which nutrition is obtained solely from fruit and vegetable juices. The health implications of such diets are disputed.
  • Master Cleanse: A form of juice fasting.

Belief-based diets

Some people’s dietary choices are influenced by their religious, spiritual or philosophical beliefs.

  • Buddhist diet: While Buddhism does not have specific dietary rules, some buddhists practice vegetarianism based on a strict interpretation of the first of the Five Precepts.
  • Hindu and Jain diets: Followers of Hinduism and Jainism may follow lacto vegetarian diets (though most do not, as some Hindu festivals require meat to be eaten), based on the principle of ahimsa (non-harming).
  • Islamic dietary laws: Muslims follow a diet consisting solely of food that is halal – permissible under Islamic law. The opposite of halal is haraam, food that is Islamically Impermissible. Haraam substances include alcohol, pork, and any meat from an animal which was not killed through the Islamic method of ritual slaughter (Dhabiha).
  • I-tal: A set of principles which influences the diet of many members of the Rastafari movement. One principle is that natural foods should be consumed. Some Rastafarians interpret I-tal to advocate vegetarianism or veganism.
  • Kosher diet: Food permissible under Kashrut, the set of Jewish dietary laws, is said to be Kosher. Some foods and food combinations are non-Kosher, and failure to prepare food in accordance with Kashrut can make otherwise permissible foods non-Kosher.
  • Seventh-day Adventist: Seventh-day Adventists combine the Kosher rules of Judaism with prohibitions against alcohol and caffeinated beverages and an emphasis on whole foods. About half of Adventists are lacto-ovo-vegetarians.
  • Word of Wisdom: The name of a section of the Doctrine and Covenants, a book of scripture accepted by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Dietary advice includes (1) wholesome plants “in the season thereof”, (2) eating meat sparingly and only “in times of winter, or of cold, or famine”, and (3) grain as the “staff of life”.

Diets followed for medical reasons

People’s dietary choices are sometimes affected by intolerance or allergy to certain types of food. There are also dietary patterns that might be recommended, prescribed or administered by medical professionals for people with specific medical needs.

  • Diabetic diet: An umbrella term for diets recommended to people with diabetes. There is considerable disagreement in the scientific community as to what sort of diet is best for people with diabetes.
  • DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension): A recommendation that those with high blood pressure consume large quantities of fruits, vegetables, whole-grains and low fat dairy foods as part of their diet, and avoid sugar sweetened foods, red meat and fats. Promoted by the US Department of Health and Human Services, a United States government organisation.
  • Elemental diet: A medical, liquid-only diet, in which liquid nutrients are consumed for ease of ingestion.
  • Elimination diet: A method of identifying foods which cause a person adverse effects, by process of elimination.
  • Gluten-free diet: A diet which avoids the protein gluten, which is found in barley, rye and wheat. It is a medical treatment for gluten-related disorders, which include coeliac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis and wheat allergy.
    • Gluten-free, casein-free diet: A gluten-free diet which also avoids casein, a protein commonly found in milk and cheese.
  • Healthy kidney diet: This diet is for those impacted with chronic kidney disease, those with only one kidney who have a kidney infection and those who may be suffering from some other kidney failure. This diet is not the dialysis diet, which is something completely different. The healthy kidney diet restricts large amounts of protein which are hard for the kidney to break down but especially limits: potassium and phosphorus-rich foods and beverages. Liquids are often restricted as well—not forbidden, just less of.
  • Ketogenic diet: A high-fat, low-carb diet, in which dietary and body fat is converted into energy. It is used as a medical treatment for refractory epilepsy.
  • Liquid diet: A diet in which only liquids are consumed. May be administered by clinicians for medical reasons, such as after a gastric bypass or to prevent death through starvation from a hunger strike.
  • Specific carbohydrate diet: A diet that aims to restrict the intake of complex carbohydrates such as found in grains and complex sugars. It is promoted as a way of reducing the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, coeliac disease, and autism.

Other diets

  • Alkaline diet: The avoidance of relatively acidic foods – foods with low pH levels – such as grains, dairy, meat, sugar, alcohol, caffeine and fungi. Proponents believe such a diet may have health benefits; critics consider the arguments to have no scientific basis.
  • Blood type diet: A diet based on a belief that people’s diets should reflect their blood types.
  • Eat-clean diet: Focusses on eating foods without preservatives, and on mixing lean proteins with complex carbohydrates.
  • Fit for Life diet: Recommendations include not combining protein and carbohydrates, not drinking water at meal time, and avoiding dairy foods.
  • Food combining diet: A nutritional approach where certain food types are deliberately consumed together or separately. For instance, some weight control diets suggest that proteins and carbohydrates should not be consumed in the same meal.
  • Gerson therapy: A form of alternative medicine, the diet is low salt, low fat and vegetarian, and also involves taking specific supplements. It was developed by Max Gerson, who claimed the therapy could cure cancer and chronic, degenerative diseases. These claims have not been scientifically proven, and the American Cancer Society claims that elements of the therapy have caused serious illness and death.
  • The Graham Diet: A vegetarian diet which promotes whole-wheat flour and discourages the consumption of stimulants such as alcohol and caffeine. Developed by Sylvester Graham in the 19th century.
  • Hay diet: A food-combining diet developed by William Howard Hay in the 1920s. Divides foods into separate groups, and suggests that proteins and carbohydrates should not be consumed in the same meal.
  • High-protein diet: A diet in which high quantities of protein are consumed with the intention of building muscle. Not to be confused with low-carb diets, where the intention is to lose weight by restricting carbohydrates.
  • High residue diet: A diet in which high quantities of dietary fiber are consumed. High-fiber foods include certain fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains.

Sharing of frozen, aged

walrus

meat among

Inuit

families.

  • Inuit diet: Inuit people traditionally consume food that is fished, hunted or gathered locally; predominantly meat and fish.
  • Jenny Craig: A weight-loss program from Jenny Craig, Inc. It includes weight counselling among other elements. The dietary aspect involves the consumption of pre-packaged food produced by the company.
  • Locavore diet: a neologism describing the eating of food that is locally produced, and not moved long distances to market.
  • Low carbon diet: Consuming food which has been produced, prepared and transported with a minimum of associated greenhouse gas emissions. An example of this was explored in the book 100-Mile Diet, in which the authors only consumed food grown within 100 miles of their residence for a year. People who follow this type of diet are sometimes known as locavores.
  • Low-fat diet
  • Low glycemic index diet
  • Low-protein diet
  • Low sodium diet
  • Low-sulfur diet

Some common macrobiotic ingredients

  • Macrobiotic diet: A diet in which processed food is avoided. Common components include grains, beans and vegetables.
  • Mediterranean diet: A diet based on habits of some southern European countries. One of the more distinct features is that olive oil is used as the primary source of fat.
  • MIND diet: combines the portions of the DASH diet and the Mediterranean diet. The diet is intended to reduce neurological deterioration such as Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Montignac diet: A weight-loss diet characterised by consuming carbohydrates with a low glycemic index.
  • Negative calorie diet: A claim by many weight-loss diets that some foods take more calories to digest than they provide, such as celery. The basis for this claim is disputed.
  • Okinawa diet: A low-calorie diet based on the traditional eating habits of people from the Ryukyu Islands.
  • Omnivore: An omnivore consumes both plant and animal-based food.
  • Organic food diet: A diet consisting only of food which is organic – it has not been produced with modern inputs such as chemical fertilizers, genetic modification, irradiation or food additives.
  • Paleolithic diet: Can refer either to the eating habits of humans during the Paleolithic era, or of modern dietary plans purporting to be based on these habits.
  • Prison loaf: A meal replacement served in some United States prisons to inmates who are not trusted to use cutlery. Its composition varies between institutions and states, but as a replacement for standard food, it is intended to provide inmates with all their dietary needs.
  • Pritikin Program for Diet and Exercise: A diet which focusses on the consumption of unprocessed food.
  • Raw foodism: A diet which centres on the consumption of uncooked and unprocessed food. Often associated with a vegetarian diet, although some raw food dieters do consume raw meat.
  • Scarsdale Medical Diet
  • Shangri-La Diet
  • Slimming World diet
  • Slow-carb diet
  • Smart For Life
  • Sonoma diet: A diet based on portion control and centered around consuming “power foods”
  • SparkPeople diet
  • Sugar Busters!: Focuses on restricting the consumption of refined carbohydrates, particularly sugars.
  • Tongue Patch Diet: Stitching a Marlex patch to the tongue to make eating painful.
  • Zone diet: A diet in which a person attempts to split calorie intake from carbohydrates, proteins and fats in a 40:30:30 ratio.

See also

References

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en.wikipedia.org

Having belly fat and a “muffin top” around the waist is common — and it can be unhealthy. Follow the advice in The Lean Belly Prescription, and according to the book cover, you canlose up to “15 pounds of dangerous belly fat in four weeks” and improve your health.

The Lean Belly Prescription is written by Travis Stork, MD, an emergency room doctor and a host of the daytime talk show The Doctors. His prescription promises you will lose weight and keep it off for good — without ever dieting or counting calories.

And there is no way to fail on this diet because it isn’t a diet.

The Lean Belly Prescription: What It Is

The Lean Belly Prescription is a collection of tips, food suggestions, and motivation to enlighten people about nutrient-rich foods, hidden calories, and how to make small changes that promote weight loss and become sustainable lifestyle habits.

“This is not a diet but an easy prescription to help people eat healthier by swapping out empty-nutrient foods like sugary beverages and processed foods and replacing it with foods that satisfy and are nutritious,” Stork says.

Eating healthy foods four to five times a day will make you feel full, control cravings, and squeeze out the junk food in your diet, Stork says.

He uses a simple ‘Pick 3 to Lean’ system designed to modify eating behavior while still enjoying your favorite foods. Choose three at a time from a list of 12 options starting with Stork’s basic “laws of leanness” to the more ramped up “lean-living turbochargers.”

Once you master three changes, move on and tackle additional options.

Examples of simple changes are eating three servings of dairy, noshing all day on fruits and vegetables, and discovering healthy fats.

Stork says it’s the small changes that can make the biggest difference and throughout the day you have 200 chances to make better choices, fight belly fat, and improve your health.

The payoff? “Reduce the dangerous visceral fat and you will have more energy, sleep better, improved health and live a longer, happier life,” Stork says. And the good news, says Stork, is that belly fat responds better to diet and exercise than fat elsewhere on the body.

Continued

Aim to reduce waistlines to less than 35 inches for women and 40 inches for men to minimize risk for health problems.

A gym membership is not required, but Stork encourages regular activity and finding opportunities to add more movement into your day. Cardio sessions, muscle building, interval training, and pages of workout diagrams in the book illustrate proper techniques for the beginner, intermediate, and expert levels of exercise.

The book includes four weeks of meal plans, grocery lists, and a basic workout plan.

The Lean Belly Prescription: What You Can Eat

Anything you want. Nothing is off the menu, but Stork suggests replacing sugary beverages with unsweetened drinks and eliminating highly processed refined foods.

Five foods are called out as nature’s perfect foods; nuts, milk, eggs, berries, and tomatoes. Lean protein (20-40 grams per meal), whole grains, fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, water, and legumes are also encouraged.

The only calories mentioned in the book are the suggested 200-calorie snacks, including a source of protein and two other food groups. Snacks are recommended midmorning and mid-afternoon to control blood sugar and cravings and reduce the chance of overeating at lunch and dinner.

Alcohol is permitted in reasonable amounts: one drink for women and two drinks for men.

Here is a sample meal plan:

Breakfast : omelet with ham, onion, mushrooms, spinach, and slice of cantaloupe

Snack: orange, Greek yogurt, and trail mix

Lunch: whole wheat quesadilla with chicken, mozzarella cheese, roasted vegetables, and sundried tomato pesto

Snack: strawberries, cottage cheese, and mixed nuts

Dinner: shrimp, bell peppers, asparagus, and onions over brown rice

The Lean Belly Prescription: How It Works

The Lean Belly Prescription works by chipping away at your unhealthy behaviors and replacing them with positive eating habits that will lead to weight loss.

Eating on a schedule, every couple of hours, will help reduce cravings and encourage readers to get in touch with hunger and satiety.

At the core of the diet plan is the NEAT (Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis) principle of burning calories without exercise. NEAT is a strategy that’s about active living: park further away, take the stairs, avoid escalators, and stand while talking on the phone, for instance.

Exercising 30 minutes per day is ideal, but regular walking and being more active in general is enough to be healthy, Stork says.

Continued The Lean Belly Prescription: Experts’ Views

Elisa Zied, MS, RD, New York nutrition consultant and author of Feed Your Family Right, gives Stork’s book a thumbs-up for its motivating and well-researched content.

“There are lots of positive aspects to this book, from the author’s cheerleading for weight loss, illustrations of exercise, attention to moving more in the day to the solid nutrition and lifestyle advice,” Zied says.

Simple, small, and practical tips, Zied says, can make a big difference and offer a new way of thinking about how to lose weight.

Since calories are nowhere to be found in the book and the plan has not been tested, Zied says it is hard to predict if the weight loss promise of up to 15 pounds is realistic. “Bottom line: how much weight you will lose depends on your genetics, current weight, calorie intake and physical activity,” she says.

Zied takes issue with the title, choppy layout of information, and lack of recipe nutrient analysis. “Not everyone who loses weight will have flat abdominals and be free of belly fat,” she says.

“It claims, on the book cover, to be a diet and weight loss plan, so the recipes should include the nutritional information so dieters know what is in the food they are eating,” Zied says.

The Lean Belly Prescription: Food for Thought

For people who are fed up with diets but want easy-to-follow tips to incorporate into their lifestyle and still want to eat their favorite foods (in limited quantities), this nondiet may be for you.

Stork, the handsome former star of the ABC reality TV show The Bachelor, might be exactly what the doctor ordered to inspire women (and men) to make lifestyle changes that will promote weight loss.

Although there is very little new information, it is comprehensive, solid advice based on research that if used properly can help dieters lose weight, incorporate more fitness, and improve their health.

You might not lose 15 pounds in four weeks, but you will learn a wealth of very helpful information that can lead to slow, steady, and most important, sustainable weight loss.

www.webmd.com

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www.hsepeople.com

  • Experts claim false interpretation of scientific studies has led to millions being ‘over-medicated’
  • Doctors claim it is time to ‘bust the myth’ of the role of saturated fat in heart disease
  • Some nations are adopting dietary guidelines to encourage high-fat foods

Experts claim eating high-fat foods such as butter and cream may be better for health

Cutting back on butter, cream and fatty meats may have done more harm to heart health than good.

Experts say the belief that high-fat diets are bad for arteries is based on faulty interpretation of scientific studies and has led to millions being ‘over-medicated’ with statin drugs.

Doctors insist it is time to bust the myth of the role of saturated fat in heart disease.

Some western nations, such as Sweden, are now adopting dietary guidelines that encourage foods high in fat but low in carbs.

Cardiologist Aseem Malhotra says almost four decades of advice to cut back on saturated fats found in cream, butter and less lean meat has ‘paradoxically increased our cardiovascular risks’.

He leads a debate online in the British Medical Journal website bmj.com that challenges the demonisation of saturated fat.

A landmark study in the 1970s concluded there was a link between heart disease and blood cholesterol, which correlated with the calories provided by saturated fat. 

‘But correlation is not causation,’ said Dr Malhotra, interventional cardiology specialist registrar at Croydon University Hospital, London.

Nevertheless, people were advised to reduce fat intake to 30 per cent of total energy and a fall in saturated fat intake to 10 per cent.

Recent studies fail to show a link between saturated fat intake and risk of cardiovascular disease, with saturated fat actually found to be protective, he said.

One of the earliest obesity experiments, published in the Lancet in 1956, comparing groups on diets of 90 per cent fat versus 90 per cent protein versus 90 per cent carbohydrate revealed the greatest weight loss was among those eating the most fat.

Professor David Haslam, of the National Obesity Forum, said: ‘The assumption has been made that increased fat in the bloodstream is caused by increased saturated fat in the diet … modern scientific evidence is proving that refined carbohydrates and sugar in particular are actually the culprits.’

Another US study showed a ‘low fat’ diet was worse for health than one which was low in carbohydrates, such as potatoes, pasta, bread.

Dr Malhotra said obesity has ‘rocketed’ in the US despite a big drop in calories consumed from fat.
‘One reason’ he said ‘when you take the fat out, the food tastes worse.’

The confusion has led to people being ‘over-medicated’ with statin drugs, such as Rosuvastatin

The food industry compensated by replacing saturated fat with added sugar but evidence is mounting that sugar is a ‘possible independent risk factor’ for metabolic syndrome which can lead to diabetes.

Dr Malhotra said the government’s obsession with cholesterol ‘has led to the over-medication of millions of people with statins’.

But why has there been no demonstrable effect on heart disease trends when eight million Britons are being prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs, he asked.

Adopting a Mediterranean diet after a heart attack is almost three times as powerful in reducing death rates as taking a statin, which have been linked to unacceptable side effects in real-world use, he added.

Dr Malhrotra said ‘The greatest improvements in morbidity and mortality have been due not to personal responsibility but rather to public health.

‘It is time to bust the myth of the role of saturated in heart disease and wind back the harms of dietary advice that has contributed to obesity.’

Dr Malcolm Kendrick, a GP and author of The Great Cholesterol Con, said Sweden had become the first western nation to develop national dietary guidelines that rejected the low-fat myth, in favour of low-carb high-fat nutrition advice.

He said ‘Around the world, the tide is turning, and science is overturning anti-fat dogma.

‘Recently, the Swedish Council on Health Technology assessment has admitted that a high fat diet improves blood sugar levels, reduces triglycerides improves ‘good’ cholesterol – all signs of insulin resistance, the underlying cause of diabetes – and has nothing but beneficial effects, including assisting in weight loss.

‘Aseem Malhotra is to be congratulated for stating the truth that has been suppressed for the last forty years’ he added.

Professor Robert Lustig, Paediatric Endocrinologist, University of San Francisco said ‘Food should confer wellness, not illness. And real food does just that, including saturated fat.

‘But when saturated fat got mixed up with the high sugar added to processed food in the second half of the 20th century, it got a bad name. Which is worse, the saturated fat or the added sugar?

‘The American Heart Association has weighed in – the sugar many times over. Instead of lowering serum cholesterol with statins, which is dubious at best, how about serving up some real food?’

Timothy Noakes, Professor of Exercise and Sports Science, University of Cape Town, South Africa said ‘Focusing on an elevated blood cholesterol concentration as the exclusive cause of coronary heart disease is unquestionably the worst medical error of our time.

‘After reviewing all the scientific evidence I draw just one conclusion – Never prescribe a statin drug for a loved one.’

www.dailymail.co.uk

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