Diet diary input

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Let’s face facts, sticking to a nutritious diet–whether it’s to manage weight or just to be healthier–isn’t easy. The one thing that all experts agree can be a big help is to write down what you eat or drink and how much you exercise. It keeps you honest, and it doesn’t let you commit “food amnesia,” forgetting about that small bite of chocolate or the lack of vegetables in every meal for the past three days. CalorieKing has a Diet Diary ($30, 7-day free trial) for your Palm that might be just the right ingredient to help with your journaling, even when you’re on the go.

The CalorieKing Diet Diary for Palm is a useful tool to track your food, fluid, and exercise wherever you may be.

On setup, you are asked to input your age, sex, weight, height, level of activity and goal (gain, lose, or maintain weight). Then, CalorieKing Diet Diary for Palm OS calculates a target level for your daily calorie intake, which you can change, if you wish. As you lose or gain weight, the program automatically recalculates your allotted daily calories. You can also set personal targets for carbohydrates, fat, fiber, and protein.

The initial splash screen has four options: Diet Diary, Database (of foods), Reports (of your intake, weight and calories burned over a period of time) and Library (of eight short articles about dieting).

Of course, the core of the program is the Diet Diary, itself, which has areas for recording what you eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner and a single section for all snacks, plus your fluid consumption and exercise. Unfortunately, you can’t customize the interface to add a meal or record your food based on the time of eating.

As you add food to your diary, your daily calories are automatically counted down. But exercise gives you an added allowance of calories. (That’s why our screen capture shows that after our breakfast and morning yoga and walk, 1,508 calories remain from our 1,459 daily allowance. Trust us, after lunch, the numbers start to go steadily down.)

CalorieKing is well-known for its pocket-size books of food lists, such as the “The CalorieKing Calorie, Fat & Carbohydrate Counter.” So, it should come as no surprise that the Diet Diary includes a database of over 50,000 foods, including almost all fast food franchise offerings, listing their nutritional values. You can also add your own foods, as long as you know their nutritional breakdowns. While you can browse through the tree structure containing thousands of categories of foods, we found it much easier to simply do a search for specific foods. Then, with a click on the screen, it was added to our diary, and deducted from our daily calories. Adding a particular exercise works in the same way. You can save favorite foods, types of exercises and even meal plans, to make it even easier to add those items to your diary.

How effective CalorieKing Diet Diary for Palm OS is depends on the user. We’re going to try it for the next few months. Having this journaling tool with us on our Palms wherever we go should make it easier to finally lose those pesky extra pounds.

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Let’s face facts, sticking to a nutritious diet–whether it’s to manage weight or just to be healthier–isn’t easy. The one thing that all experts agree can be a big help is to write down what you eat or drink and how much you exercise. It keeps you honest, and it doesn’t let you commit “food amnesia,” forgetting about that small bite of chocolate or the lack of vegetables in every meal for the past three days. CalorieKing has a Diet Diary ($30, 7-day free trial) for your Palm that might be just the right ingredient to help with your journaling, even when you’re on the go.

On setup, you are asked to input your age, sex, weight, height, level of activity and goal (gain, lose, or maintain weight). Then, CalorieKing Diet Diary for Palm OS calculates a target level for your daily calorie intake, which you can change, if you wish. As you lose or gain weight, the program automatically recalculates your allotted daily calories. You can also set personal targets for carbohydrates, fat, fiber, and protein.

The initial splash screen has four options: Diet Diary, Database (of foods), Reports (of your intake, weight and calories burned over a period of time) and Library (of eight short articles about dieting).

Of course, the core of the program is the Diet Diary, itself, which has areas for recording what you eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner and a single section for all snacks, plus your fluid consumption and exercise. Unfortunately, you can’t customize the interface to add a meal or record your food based on the time of eating.

As you add food to your diary, your daily calories are automatically counted down. But exercise gives you an added allowance of calories. (That’s why our screen capture shows that after our breakfast and morning yoga and walk, 1,508 calories remain from our 1,459 daily allowance. Trust us, after lunch, the numbers start to go steadily down.)

CalorieKing is well-known for its pocket-size books of food lists, such as the “The CalorieKing Calorie, Fat & Carbohydrate Counter.” So, it should come as no surprise that the Diet Diary includes a database of over 50,000 foods, including almost all fast food franchise offerings, listing their nutritional values. You can also add your own foods, as long as you know their nutritional breakdowns. While you can browse through the tree structure containing thousands of categories of foods, we found it much easier to simply do a search for specific foods. Then, with a click on the screen, it was added to our diary, and deducted from our daily calories. Adding a particular exercise works in the same way. You can save favorite foods, types of exercises and even meal plans, to make it even easier to add those items to your diary.

How effective CalorieKing Diet Diary for Palm OS is depends on the user. We’re going to try it for the next few months. Having this journaling tool with us on our Palms wherever we go should make it easier to finally lose those pesky extra pounds.

This story, “CalorieKing Diet Diary” was originally published by PCWorld.

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We’ve selected these apps based on their user reviews, timely updates, and overall impact in supporting people’s weight loss efforts.

Losing weight is not easy, but with two-thirds of U.S. adults considered overweight or obese, it’s a goal that more and more people are taking on with determination and vigor.

Burning calories through exercise, subscribing to the latest fad diet, or counting the calories of every morsel that passes your lips – these are all methods of weight loss that have shown varying success.

The latter, counting calories, not only gives dieters a sense of how their food intake affects their waistline, but also gives them real-time feedback, plus a greater understanding of how nutrition affects the body. There are countless apps, websites, and tools that assist people as they work toward their health and weight goals. We’ve rounded up the very best calorie counter apps for 2016.

Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker by MyFitnessPal

iPhone: Free
Android: Free

MyFitnessPal’s food database is the largest around, with over 5 million foods. This makes it easy to input your daily intake. But you can also customize recipes and add your own foods easily. View your calories, along with macro- and micronutrients, in one place. The app allows you to set caloric and macronutrient goals, so you can focus on getting the nutrition you need, without the added calories.

Calorie Counter and Food Diary by MyNetDiary

iPhone: Free
Android: Free

You can’t find a free app with more features than MyNetDiary. Not only are you able to track the basics, but you can track up to 45 micronutrients, and multiple meal and snack times. Inputting your food is easy with flexible serving sizes, a barcode scanner, and the ability to take a photo of your food and have it added to the database. You can also get daily advice and analysis to help you fine-tune your weight loss approach and stay on track.

Calorie Counter by FatSecret

iPhone: Free
Android: Free

If you get annoyed with free apps that constantly ask you to pay for upgraded features, you’ll be happy to learn that FatSecret is free. It’s a basic and effective tracking app for inputting your food, exercise, and weight progress. There’s also a journal and the ability to connect with other users. According to reviewers, this app is particularly useful for folks watching their net carb intake.

CRON-O-Meter

iPhone: $2.99
Android: $2.64

The CRON-O-Meter app is the mobile version of the website, where users can track their calories and progress toward their weight loss goals. Along with viewing calorie information on foods, you can track how you’re doing with reports and charts that show you how many calories you’re consuming and burning, how much fat you’re consuming, and more.

Lose It!

iPhone: Free
Android: Free

Goal-motivated folks will likely find Lose It! to be a worthwhile download. This weight loss app lets you set goals for your weight, body fat, and even sleep, hydration, daily exercise, body measurements, and nutrients. You can also track your daily food intake and activity level. We like the barcode scanner that allows you to quickly input a new food into the database.

My Diet Diary Calorie Counter

iPhone: Free
Android: Free

While many calorie counter apps are somewhat utilitarian in design, this one wins for its beautiful interface. And its looks aren’t the only thing My Diet Diary has going for it. Track your daily calories, exercise, and hydration, and use the forums to get questions answered and find support.

Noom Coach

iPhone: Free
Android: Free

Need help staying focused on your nutrition goals? Noom Coach’s weight loss app may be able to get you on a track to success. This app gives you something to focus on each day, like making sure you drink six glasses of water. You can also communicate with a support group and access tips and daily motivation.

Nutrition Menu

iPhone: $1.99

With Nutrition Menu, you can track your calories both at home and away. The food database with this app includes menu items from more than 360 U.S. restaurants. If you like to dine out but don’t want to ruin your diet, this app is perfect. It also has regular tracking features, like the ability to view macronutrient breakdowns and add customized foods.

Simple Calorie Count

Android: Free

This app takes a little work on the front end, as you’ll be inputting all of your foods for a personal database. But the level of customization (and accuracy) that comes from that is hard to beat. We like that you can analyze your performance over the last week or month, and that you can download your diary off of the app.

Weight Loss Coach by Fooducate

iPhone: Free
Android: Free

Losing weight and tracking your calories is often a learning process. Fooducate seeks not only to monitor what you put in your mouth, but to educate you about nutrition at the same time. In addition to tracking calories, you can track your mood, exercise, sleep, and hunger levels. We like that the app teaches users about food additives and how to better read an ingredients list.

Weight Loss Diet & Calorie Counter by SparkPeople

SparkPeople

iPhone: Free

A large database can make or break a calorie counting app, and the SparkPeople calorie counter has more than 4 million foods, making it easier (and faster) to track your daily intake. In addition to counting calories, the app connects you with the larger SparkPeople website and community, along with articles, videos, and a game that awards points for healthy behaviors.

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Making a lifestyle change can be difficult, which is why it’s important to track what you’re doing and how you feel when changing to a special diet or trying to work with special nutritional needs. The food diary is a universally used tool to help people track their progress. Whether you’re trying to lose weight, need to give up gluten, go “Paleo”, or want to track how much sugar you’re taking, a food diary is any easy way to track what you’re consuming.

Food Diary Templates

A Food Diary Can Help You Lose Weight

There are several reasons that a food diary can help people lose weight. One thing a food diary does is demonstrate your commitment to the cause; by making a point to write down breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as any grazing behavior when it comes to snacking, you’ll get an honest picture of your current habits.

The truth is, when we go on a diet, it’s easy to lie to ourselves or minimize our snacking. Our days are filled with business, and without the structure of a food diary, it’s easy to get distracted and miscalculate our calories.

However, a food diary has been show to help keep us honest with ourselves. When you write down everything you eat in a day, you’ll think twice about snacking on a calorie-packed bag of chips or grabbing a fistful of candy at the office party. That’s why it’s so important to keep a copy of your food diary and take it wherever you go. Think of it as a promise to be honest with yourself. Studies show that people who keep a food diary can lose up to 50% more weight than those who do not.

If you’re currently on a diet, or trying to lose weight and gain muscle, you can expand your food diary to include not only your caloric needs but other nutritional needs as well, such as protein, calcium, vegetable servings and more.

Accuracy in this type of food diary is very important. For this reason, you should try to only eat out at restaurants that willingly provide information on calories. Go for smaller portions of high-calorie foods, and try to split appetizers or desserts with several friends.

Food Journal Templates

Keeping A Food Journal For Medical Reasons 

Many people have food sensitivities or allergies that are hard to pin down. They may find themselves with an allergic reaction seemingly out of nowhere, or they may gradually find themselves with gastric distress with no other symptoms of disease. Sometimes it’s hard to know which food is causing a reaction in your body. Many allergists and immunologists will ask you to use a food diary template to keep track of you (or your child’s) reactions to certain foods.  While getting ready to meet with an Allergy clinic team, it can be helpful to write notes about what symptoms you or your child has after eating certain foods. A certified allergist can find out if are allergic to a certain food or if you’re sensitive to it.

A food journal kept for medical reasons is useful in the following ways:

  • Your doctor team can help identify patterns of cause and effect.
  • It may help your allergist choose which allergy tests to order.
  • It can serve as a tool to follow symptom or improvements over a period time.

What types of information should you record in the journal? You’ll want to note food consumed, drinks consumed, and any symptoms you experience. It’s a good idea to note the intensity of any symptoms. For example, was your stomach violently upset or mildly upset? Did you experience heartburn? Did you get one or more hives? Make a note of time passed from consumption to symptoms. Did you experience the symptom immediately? Or did you experience it 10 minutes later, 20 minutes later, etc.? Did the symptom go away on its own, or did you need to take a medication to ease it?

Aside from writing down what you ate, it’s important to note the source of the food, especially if you eat a lot of meals away from home. Their websites will often have a list of ingredients used in each meal, but if they don’t, you will need to investigate further by calling the restaurant location or even the corporate office. Be aware that many fast food restaurants buy precooked food from another manufacturer. Because of this, however, they usually have a label they can read off to you.

What else is helpful to record in a medical food journal? Usually significant information will include what kind of food you consumed, and how it was cooked. Was it baked? Broiled? Fried? Where di you consume the food? Was this the first time you’ve eaten it? Don’t forget to include drinks, candy, and even bubble gum. If you are allergic to a food dye or preservative, your doctor will need to know about this.

Food Log Samples

Other useful information to write down for your food diary:

  • Any medications, supplements, or vitamins you take on a daily basis.
  • Any emergency room or doctor visits due to allergic symptoms.
  • Any stressful events around the time of the reaction. (Such as tests, family events, new jobs)
  • Contact with any common allergens such as pets, latex, pollen, molds, fragrances or pain.
  • Any alcohol or drug use.
  • Any seasonal factors, such as cold or hot days.

Using a Food Diary to Plan Weight Loss or Gain

If you need to gain or lose weight, a food journal template can help you get an overview of your current habits so that you can make goals for changes. By tracking the food you eat for a full week straight, you’ll see how many calories and how much fat you’re truly getting in every meal. You may notice that you eat too many carbs every week or give into temptation too often during lunch at work by eating out. By recognizing this behavior, you’ll be able to plan around your challenges. Instead of eating out for lunch, you can start bringing a bag to work for your meals. Instead of eating bread as your carbs, you may find yourself reaching for some fresh fruits instead.

A food diary can help you make small, meaningful changes to your diet, one day at a time. Aim for realistic goals and you’ll be able to make significant improvements to your daily diet, one day at a time.

If you’re ready to get started, we offer a free food diary template on this page. You can get started tracking your food habits today.

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