Brewer\\’s yeast

Brewer’s yeast is named so because it comes from the same fungus that’s used to ferment and make beer – Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

It is important to understand however that the yeast used for brewing is live while the brewer’s yeast commonly known as a nutritional supplement is deactivated. That means the microorganisms have been killed off through pasteurization or drying but the proteins, vitamins and minerals are still there.

The Superhuman Food Pyramid recommends moderate use of brewer’s yeast because, while it is a good source of nutrients, its very nature carries some possible risks.

Read on to find out the pros and cons of brewer’s yeast and its appropriate use in your quest to Become Superhuman…

Brewer’s Yeast Benefits:

Brewer’s yeast is a typical favorite of those practicing a vegetarian diet because of the proteins and numerous B-complex vitamins that it provides. These vitamins are usually found in beef, fish and poultry. Regardless of dietary practice, this type of yeast can still adequately supply you with the following nutrients:

  • Thiamine (Vitamin B1)
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3)
  • Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5)
  • Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6)
  • Biotin (Vitamin B7 or Vitamin H)
  • Folic acid (Vitamin B9)

Besides those listed above, brewer’s yeast contains a notable amount of chromium. This mineral is found to decrease blood sugar levels. It can therefore potentially aid those suffering from diabetes by improving tolerance to glucose and reducing the need for insulin.

One study tested a yeast-based supplement on premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and found it to be effective. The dietary supplement used is called Sillix Donna and it is composed of the same microorganism that is brewer’s yeast.

Brewer’s Yeast Risks:

Some individuals are simply allergic to yeast. Sensitivity can be such that any yeast-based products, from beer to nutritional yeast supplements, could trigger the symptoms of stomach irritation, headaches and itchiness.

Other types of medical conditions that increase sensitivity to yeast are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. These are the more severe types of inflammatory bowel diseases. If you happen to have a weak digestive system or are prone to such problems, you need to be extra cautious about taking brewer’s yeast.

Although chromium’s positive effects on blood sugar levels have been studied, it is still quite possible to consume too much of this mineral and go in the opposite direction of dangerously lowering blood sugar. This is a condition known as hypoglycemia. It would be safer to consult a doctor to figure out the safe amount of brewer’s yeast to include in your diet, especially if you’re already diabetic.

Brewer’s Yeast Practical Uses:

Brewer’s yeast is commonly available in powdered form or as small flakes. It is also said to have a flavor similar to cheese which can give you an idea for its culinary uses.

You can for example sprinkle a moderate amount of powdered brewer’s yeast on popcorn to make your own cheese-flavored variety of this snack. Salad dressings and toppings on pasta dishes are also possible substitute uses of the flake form of this yeast.

The hydrolyzed yeast ingredient in soup mixes likely refers to brewer’s yeast. You can thus make a similar soup dish by adding a teaspoon or two in your own home-made broth.

It is often advised that brewer’s yeast be added at the end or after the food is cooked so that the heat doesn’t wipe out the B vitamins.

Since it’s a good source of proteins, you can pop two or three tablespoons of brewer’s yeast into the blender along with whatever fruit you’re using for a power shake or smoothie. This will make an excellent revitalizing beverage after a hard work out.

In the next post, I’ll tell you about the negative effects of processed sugar and why you should avoid it to succeed in your quest to Become Superhuman.

In the meantime, if you care to jump ahead, here is a complete listing of the herbs, spices and sweeteners on Superhuman Food Pyramid:

Eat

• Cinnamon

• Cloves

• All-spice

• Stevia

• Xylitol

• Maltitol

• Turmeric

• Curry

• Cumin

• Fennel

• Star Anise

• Garlic

• Ginger

Moderate

• Raw, Pollinated Honey

• Organic Maple Syrup

• Natural Fruit Sweeteners

• Blackstrap Molasses

• Sucanat

• Truvia

• Regular Table Salt

• Red Pepper

• Black Pepper

• Fermented Soy Sauce

• Apple Cider Vinegar

• Brewer’s Yeast

Avoid

• Processed Sugar

• Candy

• High Fructose Corn Syrup

• Regular Honey

• Agave Syrup

• Aspartame

• Sucralose

• Acesulfame

• MSG

If you have questions, comments or feedback about the pros and cons of brewer’s yeast, the Superhuman Food Pyramid, this website, or other aspects of Becoming Superhuman, then leave your thoughts below, as well as any tips you have on the pros and cons of brewer’s yeast.

Author Bio: Ben Greenfield

Ben Greenfield is head coach of the Superhuman Coach Network, and an author, speaker and consultant. His blog is at and he can be hired for coaching at credentials include:

Bachelor’s and master’s degrees from University of Idaho in sports science and exercise physiology

Personal training and strength and conditioning certifications from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

Sports nutrition certification from the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN)

Advanced bicycle fitting certification from Serotta, the “Harvard” of bicycle fitting schools

Over 10 years experience in coaching professional, collegiate, and recreational athletes from all sports

Ben hosts the highly popular fitness, nutrition and wellness website at which features blogs, podcasts, and product reviews from Ben. He is a frequent contributor to Triathlete magazine and LAVA magazine, Endurance Planet (http://www.enduranceplanet.com), the outdoor sports magazine OutThere Monthly and has been featured in WebMD, the Spokesman-Review, Inlander magazine, In-Health magazine, Fit-Pro magazine, PTontheNet, Prevention magazine, Women’s Running magazine, and Inside Triathlon magazine.

As a public speaker on fitness, nutrition, and training, Ben hosts one of the top ranked fitness podcasts in iTunes, the Get-Fit Guy (http://www.GetFitGuy.com), and has been a keynote lecturer at the Hawaii Ironman World Championships Medical Conference, the Coeur D’ Alene Ironman Medical Conference, USAT Art & Science of Coaching Symposium, Can-Fit-Pro Conference, Pilgrim’s Wellness Center Education Series, Fleet Feet Sports Endurance Sports Clinic and REI Nutrition Clinic. He sits on the board of directors for Tri-Fusion triathlon team, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and is the official coach for the YoungTri. As a triathlon coach and competitor, Ben competes at Ironman and Half-Ironman World Championships, holds a ranking as of USAT’s top ranked age grouper triathletes, and competes in 15-20 triathlons each year, both nationally and internationally.

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Brewer’s yeast is a kind of yeast that is a by-product of brewing beer. Dietary supplements containing brewer’s yeast often contain non-living, dried yeast. People use brewer’s yeast to make medicine.

Brewer’s yeast is used for diarrhea, the common cold and other upper respiratory tract infections, influenza, swine flu, loss of appetite, acne, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), recurring boils on the skin (furunculosis), and type 2 diabetes. It has also been used as a source of B vitamins, chromium, and protein.

How does it work?

Due to the chromium content of brewer’s yeast, there is interest in using it for lowering blood glucose in people with diabetes. Chromium may help the body use insulin more effectively and this can lower blood sugar levels.

Additionally, brewer’s yeast seems to stimulate chemicals (intestinal enzymes) that could help relieve diarrhea.

It also might help fight bacteria that cause infections in the intestine, as well as improve the body’s defenses against viral lung infections such as flu and the common cold.

Brewer’s yeast is a source of B vitamins and protein.

www.webmd.com

Apples and Peanut butter

This is something people either seem to have known about forever, or they find the concept so weird that when you mention it they just look at you funny and back away slowly.

Slice up some apples, grab some peanut butter, and use the apple wedges to scoop up the peanut butter. There’s a bit of an art to manipulating the peanut butter, but it’s one worth mastering because omnomnomnomnom.

‘Baked’ Potatoes

Grab a potato, wash it if you need to. Stab a bunch of holes in the top or slice a cross halfway through it. Microwave on high for a few minutes then stab it with a knife to see if it’s soft inside, it’s different depending on the size of the potato and the power of the microwave. Once you know the rough time, you can just do that.

Toppings – vegan butter/marg, hummus, crushed garlic or garlic salt, cashew cream cheese, brewers/nutritional yeast, chopped fresh chives or spring onion, the list goes on

Couscous

Instant couscous like you can get in most supermarkets is super quick and easy to make. It tastes like pasta (because it’s made of the same stuff), and you can flavour it however you want.

Boil water, pour a cup of boiled water for every half cup of couscous, leave it for a couple of minutes, add a pinch of salt if you want, and fluff it up with a fork.

For flavourings (if you want them) you could just add a dab of vegan butter or margaraine, a teaspoon of mustard, or a splash of whatever stirfry, curry, or pasta sauce you have in the cupboard.

Noodles

Instant noodles are awesome. The instant noodle cups are rough on the environment, so I try to avoid the ones with the styrofoam cups at least, or use noodles you can cook on the stove or in the microwave instead.

Sometimes finding your preferred noodles that don’t use animal unfriendly oil can be a bit of a challenge, but they’re out there! And there’s a whole range of noodles to choose from that cook almost as quickly as the instant variety (my favourite are these awesome ones made from sweet potato starch that are so springy you could use them for slingshots if you weren’t busy nomming them because they’re AMAZING with peanut sauce).

The flavour options can vary too. I’ve come across a fair few ‘chicken’ noodle packets that were accidentally vegan. If you just got plain noodles, or you’re mixing it up a little, here’s some of the easy sauces I like to use.

Sweet chilli sauce – make sure you drain the noodles for this one

Soy sauce – combined with sweet chilli sauce it’s really frickin’ good. You can drain the noodles or keep the water, either’s good.

Veggie stock – one cube to a cup of noodles (with water)

Barbecue sauce – just a little bit sweetens the noodles up nicely. Drain the noodles.

Peanut butter and soy sauce – A tablespoon of peanut butter, a splash of soy sauce, heat in the microwave (to melt the peanut butter) or stir straight through hot drained noodles, nommy. Add a bit of chilli if you like it spicy.

Optional extras

Frozen mixed veggies will also cook in roughly the same time as the noodles so long as they’re small, if they’re bigger, just put them in a few minutes earlier and then add the noodles to the boiling water.

You might find you like nuts and seeds in noodles, I prefer them in noodle dishes with thicker, more complex sauces, but that’s a personal preference.

Small TVP chunks will cook in roughly the same time as the noodles, and they flavour easily.

Sandwich type constructions

The humble sandwich. Cultures all around the world have developed technology to wrap some kind of delicious bread type scaffolding around other types of deliciousness. Pita pockets, Tortillas, Bagels, Burgers, Subs, the list goes on.

Some easy things to stuff in your bread type scaffolding:

  • Fresh tomato slices, fresh Basil (optional), and hummus. It’s super simple and it’s delicious. Also great toasted.
  • Banana sandwiches. I don’t know if this is a New Zealand thing only or what, but seriously, dry bread, or margaraine, or whatever, and banana slices. That’s all. It’s divine.
  • Avocado and tomato. With a sprinkle of salt and a splash of lemon juice if you’ve got it. Also fabulous toasted.
  • Tabbouleh. If you can get it easily ready made from the supermarket, this goes great on any kind of bread related construct. Also goes fabulously with hummus.
  • Falafel. Microwave a few spoonfuls for a minute or two, add to bread, add tomato sauce, barbecue sauce, mustard, hummus, whatever. Devour.

Cracker type things

There’s all kinds of crunchy crispy nommy things out there – rice or corn cakes, rice crackers, water crackers, the list goes on.

Stuff to put on them or dip them in

  • Peanut butter – surprisingly nommy on corn/rice cakes
  • Hummus – unsurprisingly nommy on everything
  • Fresh tomato (awesome with fresh basil)
  • Avocado
  • Olives – There’s two kinds of people in this world. The ones who love olives, and the unlucky ones who don’t have the joy of olives in their lives.
  • Sliced banana – especially good on rice/corn cakes

Sticks, chips and dips

Stuff to dip with –

  • Carrot sticks
  • Celery sticks
  • Corn chips
  • Tortilla chips
  • Toasted pita bread
  • Mini spring rolls (raw or cooked)

Stuff to dip in –

  • Hummus – it comes in a million flavours
  • Pesto (just need to find a vegan one, or make your own 🙂 )
  • Mustard
  • Salsa – home made or store bought
  • Sweet chilli sauce

Toast

Much like the humble sandwich, perhaps even pre dating it, we like to put stuff on bread, all kinds of bread.

  • Peanut butter – seriously. Just go buy some peanut butter and eat it
  • Bananas – yep, sliced bananas on toast is amazing.
  • Fresh tomato – Add salt, pepper (if you like it), and it’s divine
  • Avocado – mashed on toast with a fork, a pinch of salt, and some lemon juice, it’s divine.
  • Marmite – So about half the western world will know what I’m talking about. The rest will be dazed and confused. Google it. It’s awesome. Half of you will instantly hate it. Half of you will become helpless addicted to the magnificent mountain of b vitamins that is marmite. Also related to vegemite.
  • Baked beans – Heat em up, pile em on.

Pretzels

They’re cheap, they’re crunchy (cept for the giant soft ones, which are awesome in their own right), and they’re little edible bows. what more could you want? They’re usually vegan friendly, but it’s worth checking the bag just in case.

Vegetables

Yep. Grab some veggies, I quite like cauliflower and broccoli, put them in a covered microwave safe bowl and heat on high power for a couple of minutes. Then add whatever sauces you like (there’s a whole bunch listed here)

If you don’t have a microwave or don’t want to use one, just add about two cm (just under an inch) of water to a pot, add the veggies and cover. Bring to the boil on high heat, let it boil for a couple of minutes, then drain the water and the veggies should be cooked and nicely crisp.

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Brewer’s yeast is a kind of yeast that is a by-product of brewing beer. Dietary supplements containing brewer’s yeast often contain non-living, dried yeast. People use brewer’s yeast to make medicine.

Brewer’s yeast is used for diarrhea, the common cold and other upper respiratory tract infections, influenza, swine flu, loss of appetite, acne, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), recurring boils on the skin (furunculosis), and type 2 diabetes. It has also been used as a source of B vitamins, chromium, and protein.

How does it work?

Due to the chromium content of brewer’s yeast, there is interest in using it for lowering blood glucose in people with diabetes. Chromium may help the body use insulin more effectively and this can lower blood sugar levels.

Additionally, brewer’s yeast seems to stimulate chemicals (intestinal enzymes) that could help relieve diarrhea.

It also might help fight bacteria that cause infections in the intestine, as well as improve the body’s defenses against viral lung infections such as flu and the common cold.

Brewer’s yeast is a source of B vitamins and protein.

www.webmd.com

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